Friday, 24 January 2014

'Child-Innovac research project develops Whopping cough nasal spray vaccine

Vaccine development for whopping cough

NUI
Maynooth’s Institute of Immunology has played a key role in the
development of a more effective vaccine for pertussis (commonly known as
whooping cough), which can be administered intranasally, making it
available to greater numbers of people at a reduced cost.



Pertussis has demonstrated a resurgence in developed countries in recent
years and the disease kills approximately 300,000 children worldwide
annually. The ‘Child-Innovac’ research project has succeeded in testing
in humans, for the first time, a live bacterial vaccine, genetically
attenuated and specifically designed to be delivered as a nasal spray
from birth. The nasal delivery introduces the whopping cough vaccine to
the mucosa in the nose, which houses front-line immune defences against
pathogens of the respiratory system. - See more at:
http://www.nuim.ie/news-events/vaccine-development-whopping-cough#.dpuf
NUI
Maynooth’s Institute of Immunology has played a key role in the
development of a more effective vaccine for pertussis (commonly known as
whooping cough), which can be administered intranasally, making it
available to greater numbers of people at a reduced cost.



Pertussis has demonstrated a resurgence in developed countries in recent
years and the disease kills approximately 300,000 children worldwide
annually. The ‘Child-Innovac’ research project has succeeded in testing
in humans, for the first time, a live bacterial vaccine, genetically
attenuated and specifically designed to be delivered as a nasal spray
from birth. The nasal delivery introduces the whopping cough vaccine to
the mucosa in the nose, which houses front-line immune defences against
pathogens of the respiratory system. - See more at:
http://www.nuim.ie/news-events/vaccine-development-whopping-cough#.dpuf
NUI Maynooth’s Institute of Immunology has played a key role in the development of a more effective vaccine for pertussis (commonly known as whooping cough), which can be administered intranasally, making it available to greater numbers of people at a reduced cost.
 Pertussis has demonstrated a resurgence in developed countries in recent years and the disease kills approximately 300,000 children worldwide annually. The ‘Child-Innovac’ research project has succeeded in testing in humans, for the first time, a live bacterial vaccine, genetically attenuated and specifically designed to be delivered as a nasal spray from birth. The nasal delivery introduces the whopping cough vaccine to the mucosa in the nose, which houses front-line immune defences against pathogens of the respiratory system. - See more at: http://www.nuim.ie/news-events/vaccine-development-whopping-cough#.dpuf

NUI
Maynooth’s Institute of Immunology has played a key role in the
development of a more effective vaccine for pertussis (commonly known as
whooping cough), which can be administered intranasally, making it
available to greater numbers of people at a reduced cost.



Pertussis has demonstrated a resurgence in developed countries in recent
years and the disease kills approximately 300,000 children worldwide
annually. The ‘Child-Innovac’ research project has succeeded in testing
in humans, for the first time, a live bacterial vaccine, genetically
attenuated and specifically designed to be delivered as a nasal spray
from birth. The nasal delivery introduces the whopping cough vaccine to
the mucosa in the nose, which houses front-line immune defences against
pathogens of the respiratory system. - See more at:
http://www.nuim.ie/news-events/vaccine-development-whopping-cough#.dpuf
NUI
Maynooth’s Institute of Immunology has played a key role in the
development of a more effective vaccine for pertussis (commonly known as
whooping cough), which can be administered intranasally, making it
available to greater numbers of people at a reduced cost.



Pertussis has demonstrated a resurgence in developed countries in recent
years and the disease kills approximately 300,000 children worldwide
annually. The ‘Child-Innovac’ research project has succeeded in testing
in humans, for the first time, a live bacterial vaccine, genetically
attenuated and specifically designed to be delivered as a nasal spray
from birth. The nasal delivery introduces the whopping cough vaccine to
the mucosa in the nose, which houses front-line immune defences against
pathogens of the respiratory system. - See more at:
http://www.nuim.ie/news-events/vaccine-development-whopping-cough#.dpuf

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