Friday, 31 May 2019

Plan S Revisions

Rationale for the Revisions Made to the Plan S Principles and Implementation Guidance The revised Plan S maintains the fundamental principles but a number of important changes are proposed in the implementation guidance. These include: The timeline has been extended by one year to 2021;Transformative agreements will be supported until 2024;more options for transitional arrangements are supported;greater clarity is provided about the various compliance routes: Plan S is NOT just about a publication fee model of Open Access publishing.

Monday, 29 April 2019

The “impact” of the Journal Impact Factor in the review, tenure, and promotion process

The Journal Impact Factor (JIF) – a measure reflecting the average number of citations to recent articles published in a journal – has been widely critiqued as a measure of individual academic performance. However, it is unclear whether these criticisms and high profile declarations, such as DORA, have led to significant cultural change. In this post, Erin McKiernan, Juan Pablo Alperin and Alice Fleerackers present evidence from a recent study of review, promotion and tenure documents, showing the extent to which (JIF) remains embedded as a measure of success in the academic job market.

Friday, 8 March 2019

Taking Stock of the Feedback on Plan S Implementation Guide

In this interesting piece Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe reviews the feedback submitted in response to the Plan S consultation and highlights 7 themes that emerged from the thousands of pages submissions made to cOAlition S. Plan S is an initiative for Open Access publishing that was launched in September 2018. The plan is supported by cOAlition S, an international consortium of research funders. Plan S requires that, from 2020, scientific publications that result from research funded by public grants must be published in compliant Open Access journals or platforms.

Wednesday, 9 January 2019

Max Planck Society Ends Elsevier Subscription

The Max Planck Society, an enormous German research organization 14,000 scientists strong and comprising multiple research institutes, has ended its subscription to Elsevier journals, the organization announced in a statement on December 18. It did so in support of the German open-access initiative called Project DEAL, after unsuccessful attempts to negotiate an open-access agreement with the publisher. The organization’s digital library will no longer have access to Elsevier’s approximately 2,500 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, once the subscription expires on December 31.

Tuesday, 8 January 2019

Ten principles for the responsible use of university rankings

Ten principles for the responsible use of university rankings

University rankings are controversial. There is a lot of criticism on well-known rankings such as the Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU), commonly referred to as the Shanghai Ranking, and the World University Rankings of Times Higher Education (THE) and QS.
Nevertheless, universities often feel that they are under pressure to
show a good performance in these rankings and universities may therefore
pay considerable attention to these rankings in their decision making.

The Ten Principles are intended to guide universities, students,
governments, and other stakeholders in the responsible use of university
rankings.

Thursday, 27 September 2018

SAGE Research Methods now available from your Library

SAGE Research Methods supports research at all levels by providing material to guide users through every step of the research process. Nearly everyone at a university is involved in research, from students learning how to conduct research to faculty conducting research for publication to librarians delivering research skills training and doing research on the efficacy of library services. SAGE Research Methods has the answer for each of these user groups, from a quick dictionary definition, a case study example from a researcher in the field, a downloadable teaching dataset, a full-text title from the Quantitative Applications in the Social Sciences series, or a video tutorial showing research in action.

Tuesday, 5 June 2018

What’s new in Open Access?

This a new blog by Danny Kingsley who is the Deputy Director, Cambridge University Library responsible for Scholarly Communication & Research Services. Her role focuses on establishing new policies and strategies for scholarly communication in the digital age. It looks like a useful way to keep up to date with developments in Open Access. "The world of Open Access moves fast and it can be difficult to keep up. We run regular updates for our community here at Cambridge and following a recent webinar, figured a blog about it might be a good idea too. Strap yourselves in, this is a bumpy ride." https://unlockingresearch-blog.lib.cam.ac.uk/?p=2011

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Academic Writing Workshop in the Library

When: Monday, October 16, 2017 - 10:00 to 12:30 Where: Training Rooms A&B, Maynooth University Library Academic Writing in the Social Sciences (Taylor & Francis in association with Maynooth University Library)

Monday, 19 June 2017

Microsoft Academic is on the verge of becoming a bibliometric superpower

Last year, the new Microsoft Academic service was launched. Sven E. Hug and Martin P. Brändle look at how it compares with more established competitors such as Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science. While there are reservations about the availability of instructions for novice users, Microsoft Academic has impressive semantic search functionality, broad coverage, structured and rich metadata, and solid citation analysis features. Moreover, accessing raw data is relatively cheap. Given these benefits and its fast pace of development, Microsoft Academic is on the verge of becoming a bibliometric superpower.

Thursday, 25 May 2017

So you’ve decided to blog? These are the things you should write about

The centuries-old tradition of writing for advocacy is continued into the digital era by blogging. But what should you be writing about? As part of a series previewing their new book "Communicating Your Research with Social Media", Amy Mollett, Cheryl Brumley, Chris Gilson and Sierra Williams consider the various different types of blog posts and how each might be used by academics.