Monday, 29 April 2013

Revision tips: why sleep and repetition will boost your brain power | Education | guardian.co.uk

Revision tips: why sleep and repetition will boost your brain power | Education | guardian.co.uk

 When it comes to revising, how do you know which techniques work?

Yahoo! donates servers to NUI Maynooth to design better Wave Energy Converters

NUI MaynoothCommunications OfficePress ReleaseYahoo

 Yahoo! has donated 44 servers to Centre for Ocean Energy Research at the NUI Maynooth. The machines are enabling research that was previously impossible in data-intensive computing. At NUI Maynooth, the servers will be crunching data on renewable ocean wave power.
The donation is part of Yahoo!’s Y! STAR programme (Yahoo! Servers To Academic Researchers) under which Yahoo! is refurbishing and donating decommissioned servers to university researchers. Yahoo! has already donated over  1,500 servers to  23 of the top universities in the USA. The shipment to NUI Maynooth is the first in Europe. 

DNA: the double helix that changed the world - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Thu, Apr 25, 2013

DNA: the double helix that changed the world - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Thu, Apr 25, 2013

 Sixty years ago,a scientific-research paper was published that would change the world. James Watson and Francis Crick revealed the chemical structure of DNA, the molecule that contains the genetic blueprint and drives inheritance.

Friday, 26 April 2013

Robot could help turtle conservation - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Wed, Apr 24, 2013

Robot could help turtle conservation - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Wed, Apr 24, 2013

Scientists have developed a robot that mimics the movements of a newborn sea turtle as it struggles across the sand towards water. They hope the “Flipperbot” may aid in turtle conservation by learning more about locomotion on complex and uneven surfaces.

For the full text of the article in the current edition of  Bioinspiration and Biomimetics search the Journal Title in the Libraries eJournals search tab on the Library home page.

 Abstract: To discover principles of flipper-based terrestrial locomotion we study the mechanics of a hatchling sea turtle-inspired robot, FlipperBot (FBot), during quasi-static movement on granular media. FBot implements a symmetric gait using two servo-motor-driven front limbs with flat-plate flippers and either freely rotating or fixed wrist joints. For a range of gaits, FBot moves with a constant step length. However, for gaits with sufficiently shallow flipper penetration or sufficiently large stroke, per step displacement decreases with each successive step resulting in failure (zero forward displacement) within a few steps. For the fixed wrist, failure occurs when FBot interacts with ground disturbed during previous steps, and measurements reveal that flipper generated forces decrease as per step displacement decreases. The biologically inspired free wrist is less prone to failure, but slip-induced failure can still occur if FBot pitches forward and drives its leading edge into the substrate. In the constant step length regime, kinematic and force-based models accurately predict FBot's motion for free and fixed wrist configurations, respectively. When combined with independent force measurements, models and experiments provide insight into how disturbed ground leads to locomotory failure and help explain differences in hatchling sea turtle performance.

Thursday, 18 April 2013

The iPad as a research tool | Mike Press

The iPad as a research tool | Mike Press
 A Blog written by Mike Press Professor of Design Policy and Associate Dean of Design at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, the University of Dundee in Scotland, UK

'So, you’re a research student or academic who has just laid their hands on a new iPad. How useful is it as a research tool? What advantages does it have over a laptop? Is it just a clever shiny gadget for watching movies on long train rides?'
A interesting piece that looks at the  iPad as a research gathering tool, a tool for reading and browsing and the iPad as a research dissemination tool. He also offers a commentary on some very useful apps available. It was last updated in April 2011.

New Reaxys Interface and Expanded Content

http://www.elsevier.com/online-tools/promo-page/reaxys-201303-new-reaxys-teaser?M=bfe07701-7acc-4ebc-8132-7bd36b05e072

Wednesday, 17 April 2013

TB or not TB: an answer to the culling question - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Thu, Apr 11, 2013

TB or not TB: an answer to the culling question - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Thu, Apr 11, 2013

Culling for TB kills 6,000 badgers a year, but a vaccination pilot scheme could eliminate the disease in cattle without harming the native Irish mamma. A field trial to test the BCG vaccine in wild badgers has seen scientists catch, tag and vaccinate hundreds in Co Kilkenny over the past three years.


Tuesday, 16 April 2013

BBC iPlayer - Material World: Publishing, Turbulence, Evolution: a discussion of the future of science publication and how this wealth of research will be managed in the future.

BBC iPlayer - Material World: Publishing, Turbulence, Evolution


Publishing, Turbulence, Evolution
Duration:
30 minutes
First broadcast:
Thursday 11 April 2013
What's it like being a research academic these days? Not so many piles of dusty books and journal articles lying around, many more hundreds or even thousands of files sitting on your computer. But how to connect them, sort them and cross reference them? This was a problem felt by Victor Henning, co-founder of a London tech startup called Mendeley, who aimed to build a tool for researchers around the world to use to smooth their work flow and to increase collaboration by revealing the people who are reading the same articles. Mendeley were bought outright this week by Reed Elsevier, the Dutch publishing house who publish more than 2000 scientific journals, including the Lancet. Victor Henning is joined by Jason Priem of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, author of a recent horizon scanning feature in Nature, to discuss the future of science publication and how this wealth of research will be managed in the future.

Elsevier and Mendeley: Why the Science-Journal Giant Bought the Rebel Start-Up : The New Yorker

Elsevier and Mendeley: Why the Science-Journal Giant Bought the Rebel Start-Up : The New Yorker

The Kilkenny Workhouse mass burials: an archaeology of the Irish Potato Famine

The Kilkenny Workhouse mass burials: an archaeology of the Irish Potato Famine

 The horrifying human cost of the Great Irish Famine is well known, but what archaeological traces has it left? Recent research at Queen’s University Belfast by Jonny Geber has revealed the realities of life for a community struck down during the crisis, and how a misdiagnosis may have added to the suffering.

RP - People awards

RP - People awards

The Wellcome Trust invites applications for its people awards. These enable individuals to explore the impact of biomedical science on society, its historical roots, effects on different cultures, or the ethical questions that it raises. The awards support small-to-medium-sized one-off projects or projects that pilot new ideas with an aim to scale up or become sustainable following the grant, or they can part-fund larger projects. Projects should aim to achieve at least one of the following:
•stimulate interest, excitement and debate about biomedical science through various methods;
•support formal and informal learning about biomedical science;
•reach new audiences not normally engaged with biomedical science, as well as continuing to target existing audiences;
•examine the social, cultural, historical and ethical impact of biomedical science;
•encourage new ways of thinking about biomedical science;
•encourage high-quality interdisciplinary practice and collaborative partnerships;
•investigate and test new methods of engagement, participation and education.

Current Protocols online fulltext laboratory manuals for life scientists | NUI Maynooth Library

Current Protocols online fulltext laboratory manuals for life scientists | NUI Maynooth Library

Monday, 15 April 2013

Want to search more effectively using the the Scopus, Embase and Reaxy's databases? | NUI Maynooth Library

Want to search more effectively using the the Scopus, Embase and Reaxy's databases? | NUI Maynooth Library

The Library invites you to three training sessions on the morning of the 24th of April
with Dr Charles Martinez Elsevier’s Product Sales Manager for Northern Europe.
They are one-hour sessions beginning at 9.30 (with a 15 min break between sessions) in training Room A on the ground, floor of the Library.
Schedule:
9.30 AM:    Scopus
10.45 AM:  Embase
12.00 AM:  Reaxys

For more details or to book your place contact ciaran.quinn@nuim.ie or phone at 7086151

Scientists make rat kidneys in laboratory - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Mon, Apr 15, 2013

Scientists make rat kidneys in laboratory - Science News | Daily News from The Irish Times - Mon, Apr 15, 2013

 Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston have made functioning rat kidneys in the laboratory, a bioengineering achievement that may one day lead to the ability to create replacement organs for people with kidney disease.
The scientists said the rat kidneys produced urine in the laboratory as well as when transplanted into rats. The kidneys were made by stripping donor kidneys of their cells and putting new cells that regenerate tissue into them.

Thursday, 11 April 2013

Watch out for the International Space Station over Dublin sky tonight - Irish Innovation News – Siliconrepublic.com

Watch out for the International Space Station over Dublin sky tonight - Irish Innovation News – Siliconrepublic.com
 Stargazers are set to be in for a treat tonight as the International Space Station (ISS) will be passing over Dublin at around 9.49pm. And provided that the skies are clear, people will be able to view the station as a very bright object drifting across the sky.
According to Astronomy Ireland, the ISS will be most visible over the Irish capital at around 9.49pm tonight.

Elsevier welcomes Mendeley | Elsevier Connect

Elsevier welcomes Mendeley | Elsevier Connect
 Elsevier’s acquisition of an innovative research management and social collaboration tool will enable the platform to further expand, giving researchers access to more content.  Mendeley is a company that has made a big name for itself with an innovative platform that helps researchers organize their work, discover the latest research and collaborate. As Managing Director of Academic and Government Markets for Elsevier, Olivier Dumon writes about how Elsevier started collaborating with this London-based company, and why joining forces will help both companies serve the research community better.
The article also discusses Mendeleys Institutional Edition (MIE ) which is a tool that helps universities analyze research activity in real-time, providing a complement to the traditional Impact Factor system of academic citations

JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols

JoVE | Peer Reviewed Scientific Video Journal - Methods and Protocols

Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) is a peer reviewed, PubMed indexed journal devoted to the publication of biological, medical, chemical and physical research in a video format.

Wednesday, 10 April 2013

List of individual predatory scholarly Scholarly Open Access Journals

LIST OF INDIVIDUAL JOURNALS | Scholarly Open Access
 Potential, possible, or probable predatory scholarly open-access journals
This is a list of questionable, scholarly open-access journals. We recommend that scholars read the available reviews, assessments and descriptions provided here, and then decide for themselves whether they want to submit articles, serve as editors or on editorial boards.  The criteria for determining predatory journals are here.

For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia - NYTimes.com

For Scientists, an Exploding World of Pseudo-Academia - NYTimes.com

The scientists who were recruited to appear at a conference called Entomology-2013 thought they had been selected to make a presentation to the leading professional association of scientists who study insects.  But they found out the hard way that they were wrong.

Science writing prize | Science | The Guardian

Science writing prize | Science | The Guardian

With the Wellcome Trust Science Writing Prize 2013 open for entries, three science writers – Geoff Brumfiel, senior reporter for Nature; Jo Marchant, author of Decoding the Heavens; and Linda Geddes, a New Scientist reporter – discuss their tricks of the trade. 'I don't have a lot of things I don't like about bad science writing because I'll just stop reading it – and that's what other readers do too.' says Brumfiel. Geddes warns against the pitfalls of over researching, and Marchant says you have to find ways to excite the reader.They discuss 'what is a good science story?'
There are also a number of other videos(including one from Bill Bryson) and articles on various aspects of Science writing.

Call for DNA biologists to join fight against deadly new threats to wildlife | Environment | The Observer

Call for DNA biologists to join fight against deadly new threats to wildlife | Environment | The Observer

Research into creation of a new generation of synthetic organisms could be the way to save some of the natural world's most endangered species, according to conservationists

Mammoth skeleton unearthed in Mexico City - video | World news | guardian.co.uk

Mammoth skeleton unearthed in Mexico City - video | World news | guardian.co.uk
 An ancient mammoth skeleton, estimated to be more than 10,000 years old, is displayed after being discovered in Mexico City. The bones found in the borough of Milpa Alta are thought to be one of the most complete sets found in Mexico. Excavators think the mammal weighed 10 tonnes and stood at three metres high

Tuesday, 9 April 2013

Noam Chomsky awarded UCD Ulysses Medal

Noam Chomsky awarded UCD Ulysses Medal

The link contains a video of Noam Chomsky's UCD lecture entitled: 'Can Civilisation  Really Survive Existing Capitalism?' . Chomsky is very interesting on 'Climate Change Denial'  propaganda in America from 16 minutes10 seconds and fossil fuels at 38 minutes 48 seconds  onwards in his lecture.

Wednesday, 3 April 2013

Irelands' BioBlitz

Irelands' BioBlitz

The National Biodiversity Data Centre, in conjunction with the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Northern Ireland Environment Agency, Coillte and the Centre for Environmental Data and Recording is organising Ireland’s BioBlitz event on 24 & 25 May 2013.  The event will be held at four locations; Wicklow Mountains National Park, Co. Wicklow, Burren National Park, Co. Clare, Lough Key Forest Park, Co. Roscommon and Colebrooke Estate, Co. Fermanagh.

Beyond the Library: Researchers and libraries must work together to respond to changes in scholarly communication | Impact of Social Sciences

Beyond the Library: Researchers and libraries must work together to respond to changes in scholarly communication | Impact of Social Sciences

Mobile phone's 40th anniversary: from 'bricks' to clicks | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Mobile phone's 40th anniversary: from 'bricks' to clicks | Technology | guardian.co.uk

 Mobile phone technology has come a long way since the first mobile phone call was made 40 years ago – but there is a lot more innovation ahead, according to one expert.
It was on 3 April 1973 that Motorola employee Martin Cooper made a call in New York on a Motorola DynaTAC – dubbed a "brick" due to its size and weight – which was widely regarded globally as the first public mobile phone call.
The device was 9 inches tall, comprised 30 circuit boards, had a talk-time of 35 minutes, and took 10 hours to recharge.

Tuesday, 2 April 2013

The future of publishing

Specials : Nature

After nearly 400 years in the slow-moving world of print, the scientific publishing industry is suddenly being thrust into a fast-paced online world of cloud computing, crowd sourcing and ubiquitous sharing. Long-established practices are being challenged by new ones – most notably, the open-access, author-pays publishing model. In this special issue, Nature takes a close look at the forces now at work in scientific publishing, and how they may play out over the coming decades.

Important role for ocean warming and increased ice-shelf melt in Antarctic sea-ice expansion : Nature Geoscience : Nature Publishing Group

Important role for ocean warming and increased ice-shelf melt in Antarctic sea-ice expansion : Nature Geoscience : Nature Publishing Group

 Changes in sea ice significantly modulate climate change because of its high reflective and strong insulating nature. In contrast to Arctic sea ice, sea ice surrounding Antarctica has expanded1, with record extent2 in 2010. This ice expansion has previously been attributed to dynamical atmospheric changes that induce atmospheric cooling3. Here we show that accelerated basal melting of Antarctic ice shelves is likely to have contributed significantly to sea-ice expansion. Specifically, we present observations indicating that melt water from Antarctica’s ice shelves accumulates in a cool and fresh surface layer that shields the surface ocean from the warmer deeper waters that are melting the ice shelves.

Ships must kill off the beasties in the ballast water - opinion - 01 April 2013 - New Scientist

Ships must kill off the beasties in the ballast water - opinion - 01 April 2013 - New Scientist

Dangerous biological stowaways could easily be banished from ships' ballast. It's a disgrace that rich nations won't play ball, says Fred Pearce

Some Thoughts on Beyond the Paper

Some Thoughts on Beyond the Paper | Gobbledygook 
(A interesting Blog by Martin Fenner about how the internet is changing scholarly communication)

 Today the journal Nature has released a special on the Future of Publishing. It includes a lot of interesting reading, but I want to focus on the comment Beyond the Paper by Jason Priem. In the comment Jason describes his vision of the future of scholarly communication, a future where many of today’s roles for articles and journals will be replaced by the decoupled journal and online tools taking the lead in dissemination and filtering of scholarly content.